What to do and so many choices

What to do and so many choices.  That is the situation we are in.  We sold our spacious 4 bedroom home with an in-ground swimming pool 5 years ago.  Our kids were all grown and college educated and we were ready for a big change.  So we sold our house and bought an RV to travel the country.  And that is what we did for 5 wonderful, exciting years.  Then coronavirus struck and shut down the US.  Being of the 65+ older population, yes we are “baby boomers”…we decided to play it safe and stay in our small 2 bedroom house in Indiana.  Plus, we have our youngest son, who is unmarried and takes care of the house while we are gone, that would be able to help us.  You know, grocery shopping, picking up our meds and etc.

Then we fast forward, or slowly forward to today.  Should we continue our adventures or should we acknowledge we are getting older and stay put?  It’s a big decision for us.  Our kids live in Washington state, Texas, Ohio and Indiana, we’ve always had fun visiting them while we travel.  We are pretty healthy and able to get around and take care of ourselves.  We’ve spent a winter in Harlingen, Texas in the Rio Grande Valley which we loved.  We were enjoying wintering in the Hill Country west of Austin when the virus hit the US and then we got coronavirsed in after retuning to Indiana.  We were going to spend this winter’s months in the southern part of Texas and visit our Texas family while there.

So, maybe writing it down has helped me see things clearer and I’m questioning why I’m even thinking of giving up our adventurous traveling lifestyle. We just wish we could get our COVID-19 vaccines sooner than later.

Have fun and pass some time

“Stuck at home” is the norm for lots of folks that currently need to be especially vigilant in avoiding the virus. One task that is available to provide entertainment and pass some time is working on a 1000 piece puzzle. The one  that we are working on is pictured above. It is hard. Fun but hard!

Thankfully a vaccine is now approved and in route to first distribution. Stay vigilant!

Wow! Look at that thing grow

Here’s a photographic update from Roadtirement’s vegetable garden:

Cucumber July 9th

Same one, July 14th

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It will soon be time to pick this cucumber. There are more starting to grow on the vines, so we’ll have more cucumbers as the summer goes on. With the COVID-19 surging in some areas of the country, we don’t know when it will be safe to travel again.

Don’t mess up now! Stay safe and Be smart!

Young robin out back

Immature robin, about 6 feet away

Today was a good day to sit out side. Sher and I were enjoying our own little wildlife show. The feeder had a near constant flow of finches and sparrows. What seeds that fell on the ground below the feeder became a buffet for doves, cowbirds, Cardinals and Redwings. Young squirrels were romping around. We heard the tell-tale rat-ta-ta-tat of at least two woodpeckers. Then came  mature and immature robins. One young one hopped close to me.

And then he saw me

It is so relaxing sitting outside on a beautiful day. Sher and I have our binoculars, books, drinks, critters to watch, and most importantly, each other. We’re already discussing where we want to go this winter, but for now we’re grateful that we can stay safe in our home base.

A different 10th anniversary for Roadtirement

Our comfortable site near Austin

Right to the point, today is the tenth week anniversary of the beginning of our self- imposed isolation which began on February 25th.

Sher and I were on our Winter Texan living when the coronavirus thing was starting to heat up big time. We got out of Seattle in the end of January after visiting our daughter and her family, just before that Nursing home COVID-19 outbreak was reported. We were in our RV Resort in the Hill Country west of Austin. We’d planned on finishing February in Austin, and then heading to the Rio Grande Valley for March.

As the media brought more and more accounts of an upcoming pandemic, regardless of source, we decided that we would be better off in our home base in Indiana. As it turned out, that was a good decision because as things got worse most RV parks and campgrounds closed. So we got back to our house on February 25th.

Nearly empty lot at Cracker Barrel: carry out only

That began what is now our tenth week in “isolation”. We are both over 65, and I have more than one of those pesky underlying health issues that make for a scary scenario if the coronavirus infects us. So for the past 10 weeks we have been basically stuck at home. We’ve been out just a few times, with our son driving. He has been going to the grocery and pharmacy for us.  The only retail place that Sher and I have visited was a farm store for some flowers. We stayed outside and way away from other customers and store staff.

The State of Indiana is now going through a series of stages getting back to “normal”. By July 4th any restrictions will almost be gone. There will still be warnings for us old folks with underlying health issues. We are supposed to “adhere to social distancing guidelines and remain cautious at work and in (sic) our communities” so states the Back On Track Indiana recommendations in Stage 5.

Roadtirement has had 70 days of isolation. We will have to decide what activities will be safe for us. I don’t think either of us can afford to catch this damned virus, and so far there is no treatment or vaccine.  Sigh…

Feeding birds and umbrellas for social distancing

The phone image isn’t the best, but you can see the cute (?) little English sparrow enjoying a meal at our recently installed bird feeder. You can also see the corn cob, now devoid of any corn kernels, sticking up from the tree. We put a nail in the tree, drilled a hole down the center of the cob, and voila! a squirrel feeding station.

This danged COVID-19 stay at home stuff is really, really getting old. We still miss going out to eat, going to a casino (we like the free play!) and being able to travel to see the kids and grand kids.

Oh, and we saw something different on a CNN internet report. There is a village in India named Thannermukkom that has given out 10,000 umbrellas. The idea is that if you walk around with an open umbrella, and others do the same, it forces you to not get close to each other. Not sure you are the 6 feet away, but definitely not shoulder to shoulder.

Stay calm,  remember the rules, and wash those hands and keep physical distance!

Roadtirement’s tomato plant growth

Photo taken April 19th

Photo taken April 27th

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It was a week ago that we first showed you our tomato seedlings. Here is a picture taken just now, on the 27th. The peppers, bottom, are also continuing to grow, but not as fast as the tomatoes.  The tomatoes will probably need to be transplanted into a larger container very soon.

Keep up your safety protocols! Don’t slip up now, we’ve come too far…

A pair of Mallard ducks and a walk

Even the ducks obeyed and stayed 6 feet away

Sher and I and our son ventured out yesterday for drive and a walk in the sun. We found the weather to be near perfect with temps right around 70 with a moderate breeze. Cabin fever is really starting to set in so we thought it best to get a change of scenery. A lot of people were out enjoying the day. Everyone we passed respected the “social distancing” recommendations. We felt that we were safe in this activity.

Are you struggling with cabin fever? How are you breaking up the monotony of the stay at home rules of the COVID-19 pandemic?

Follow recommendations to stay healthy!

Roadtirement’s tomato plantings

One thing we have decided to pursue during our stay at home isolation is grow some garden plants. We went ahead and started some tomato plants inside, as per recommendations. Our son cut some plastic water bottles in half and used some self sterilized soil for the inside seed beds.

Photo taken April 10th

Photo taken April 19th

 

 

 

 

 

 

The April 10th photo shows the tomato seedlings. You can see in the April 19th shot how much the tomato seedlings have grown. In addition, the two containers in the foreground are peppers. We are hopeful that we’ll get some tomatoes and peppers after we transplant the seedlings.

We have a small garden plot in the backyard.  Hopefully we will reap the rewards of same. We’ll keep you posted…

When Roadtirement meets Indiana’s shutdown order

Sher and I have been in a stay at home situation since we got back a month or so early from our usual stint as Winter Texans. Since our return to Indiana on February 25th we have been really in a stay at home mode courtesy of the COVID-19 pandemic. With our ages and my “underlying health issues” we have to be careful. So we thought we’d share some of what makes up Roadtirement’s self-isolation environment. What do we have,  how do we live day to day, and what’s some of the stuff we’re doing when we can’t go to the casinos, live theater or set up and sell at festivals and flea markets.

Pictured is a very nice and vintage hiking trails map from Tucson. The topographic map is dated 1967 and was published by the Southern Arizona Hiking Club. The map centers around Mt. Lemmon, north east of Tucson, in the Santa Catalina Range.  Mt. Lemmon is a very popular recreation area with miles of trails in the rugged terrain of the mountains.

Details of Mt. Lemmon w/trails

The map legend

We got this map when we were visiting Tucson a few years ago. I spotted it in a listing for an estate sale and was the lucky bidder. I did my graduate work at the University of Arizona in the early 70s and made many of the 2 hour trips from Tucson to the top. That sparked my interest in the map that now lives on our living room wall.

Do you have anything in your house or RV that reminds you of experiences from decades ago?