Metamora, Indiana shops, mill and Whitewater canal

Metamora is a quaint little historic village located about halfway between Indianapolis and Cincinnati on US Highway 52. In the mid 1800’s it was a thriving town on the then busy Whitewater Canal. Horse drawn barges carried goods, the grist mill ground flour and a railroad serviced the village.

The grist mill

We visited on a Friday afternoon during what they call Christmas Walk. There are quite a few shops and places to eat in the village. It used to be a thriving tourist attraction. However on our visit there were very few people. The folks we saw appeared to be resident shop owners.

Canal boat grounded until the canal is repaired and full. It does make a good platform for Christmas decor

The canal aqueduct that runs over another creek. This is the only one in existence

 

 

 

 

 

 

The canal usually offers horse drawn boat rides, however there is some kind of construction underway and the canal is about empty. There will be no boat rides until sometime in 2018.

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Visit Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis

Infamous bank robber John Dillinger's family marker

Infamous bank robber John Dillinger’s family marker

Crown Hill Cemetery is on the near Northwest side of Indianapolis. It was first created as a cemetery during the Civil War, and eventually two different National Cemetery areas were established. The grounds are beautiful and host many visitors all year long.

The facility is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It is the burial site of a President (Benjamin Harrison) and a notorious bank robber (John Dillinger). Other notable burials include poet James Whitcomb Riley, Col. Eli Lilly, three U.S Vice Presidents, 14 U. S. Senators and 11 Indiana Governors. The cemetery grounds are noted for the beauty and solitude that offer visitors a place to run, walk, bike or even have a picnic.

View from James Whitcomb Riley's grave: Indy skyline

View from James Whitcomb Riley’s grave: Indy skyline

National Cemetery, Union Soldiers

National Cemetery, Union Soldiers

Oliver Morton, Indiana Governor during the Civil War

Oliver Morton, Indiana Governor during the Civil War

The Gothic Chapel

The Gothic Chapel

The remains of the historic Starr Piano and Gennett Recording studio

The origianl Genett Parrot logo still seen on the wall of the remaining brick building

The origianl Genett Parrot logo still seen on the wall of the remaining brick building

Richmond Indiana is a very history filled town on the Ohio-Indiana border in the central part of the state. Both I-70 and Historic US 40 run through Richmond. One of the historic sites in Richmond is the remains of the old Starr Piano manufacturing plants and the Genett Recording studios.

Starr made high end pianos beginning in the 1870’s. The remaining Starr pianos are highly sought after by collectors and musicins alike. The Gennett recordng Studos were in business from 1920 to 1934. The records were made in a primitive concrete and brick building with little acoustical features.

Legend says that an Oriental rug from the Gennett mansion was used as a wall hanging to deaden the echo sounds during the recording sessions.

Louis Armstrong honored on the sidewalk next to the remains of the old recording studio. There are many musicians so honored.

Louis Armstrong honored on the sidewalk next to the remains of the old recording studio. There are many musicians so honored.

Many famous musicians of the times got their first recordings made at Gennett. Hoagy Carmicheal’s big band recorded there. Louis Armstrong got his start in the Gennett studio. The studio was known as the first one to record jazz, blues, country and gospel genres. The Great Depression signaled the end of Genett Records as it did many other record companies of the times.

The remaining portion of the brick factory now has a modern steel structure and metal roof system. Ths building is used for concerts and other civic events.

When in Richmond be sure to seek out the old Starr Piano buliding. You just might hear echos of music from the past. Read more at the Starr Gennett Foundation website.

The remaining structure from what used to be a huge manufacturing complex on the White River in Richmond.

The remaining structure from what used to be a huge manufacturing complex on the White River in Richmond.

The remaining smoke stack from the Starr Piano factory.

The remaining smoke stack from the Starr Piano factory.

A different perspective of the old factory

A different perspective of the old factory