A pretty country church with cemetery

On our adventure yesterday we came across the Rock Creek Baptist Church, a lovely little (and typical) country church and associated cemetery. Many many areas of rural America are dotted with small churches. Before cars, rural churches usually sprang up within an easy buggy trip for most families.

Sher standing beside the Church Marquee

The Rock Creek Cemetery across the road

A distinguished old family monument

A sad story for James

RIP Estella, a loved daughter

Our son caught us peeking into the sanctuary through the doors!

We noticed that the “Rock Creek Baptist” lettering above the door looked quite a bit like the lettering on many of the old covered bridges we have been visiting. A search online failed to come up with any history of this church, other than it is listed on the American Baptist roles. The church address is 11168 S County Rd 100 W, Westport, Indiana.

 

Otter Creek covered bridge

In what some may say is an area “out in the middle of nowhere” in Ripley County, Indiana, travelers will stumble upon a unique and historic covered bridge. Built in 1884 by Thomas A. Hardman, this bridge has a unique history as well.

Closed to road traffic in 1996, it is now open only to foot traffic.

The Otter Creek Bridge, also known locally as the Holton Bridge, is constructed with the Howe truss system. This design was invented by a William Howe, an American architect born in 1803. The Howe truss design, patented in 1840, became one of the most popular structural designs and continued to see use in later metal bridge designs.

View of the 113 foot bridge over Otter Creek

Maj examining the deck timber supports

A good view of the Howe truss system, and the roof supports as well

Nice information signage!

The bridge is in excellent condition

The bridge in 1943 (courtesy bridgehunter.com)

The bridge roof was partially ripped off during a straight line wind storm just months after it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Repairs were completed quickly and the structure again opened to pedestrian traffic. This piece of American history is located in a peaceful and beautiful setting and worth the drive to see.

 

A variety of scenes we saw today

Today we decided to brave the heat and head out for an adventure, mainly to seek out some more covered bridges. We came across some different sights during the day!

The “Tipsy Trolley” was in a barn yard. Perhaps a mobile beer party bus?

This old store front likes B&W treatment

You can’t get away from politics…

Someone likes old ad signs. So does the barn.

Sun and shadows on a narrow country road

Water reflections, clouds and trees

One thing for sure, you never know what you’ll see in the Indiana countryside.

 

Honky Tonk Angels is at Beef & Boards Dinner Theatre

Take three different women from three different backgrounds, each with, however, a love of music and a desire to better themselves, and you have the makings of a rousing romp through the annals of classic Country Music. Three veterans of Beef and Boards’  shows bring incredible singing talent to the stage in the form of the new singing group The Honky Tonk Angels.

Darlene (Shelbi Berry), left, plays guitar and sings “It Wasn’t God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels” with Sue Ellen (Kaylee Verble), center, and Angela (Bridgette Ludlow)

Angela Bodine, played by Bridgette Ludlow, hails from Texas. Darlene Purvis, played by Shelbi Berry, leaves the poverty of Mississippi for her dreams of stardom. And finally we meet Sue Ellen Smith Barney Fife, played by Kaylee Verble. She’s a former secretary who has a jerk of a boss. When these gals get together hold onto your Stetson ’cause here comes a toe tapping good time!

On stage before the show. The band will be behind the horseshoe partition, which also serves as stage center actor’s entrance/exit

Get ready, as Honky Tonk Angels includes more than 30 classic country tunes from such artists as Dolly Parton, Loretta Lynn, and Tanya Tucker.. Among these favorites are  “I Will Always Love You,” “Coal Miner’s Daughter,” “Stand By Your Man,” “These Boots Are Made for Walking,” “Delta Dawn,” “Your Good Girl’s Gonna Go Bad,” and “It Wasn’t God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels.” If you like classic country, you will love the Honky Tonk Angels. We certainly enjoyed the show!

Angela (Bridgette Ludlow) sings “Harper Valley PTA”

To purchase tickets online go to the Beef and Boards website. Tickets are also available by calling the Beef & Boards Dinner Theatre Box Office at 317.872.9664 anytime between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday and from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays. Honky Tonk Angels will play through Aug. 14th.

Zaharakos Ice Cream Parlor and dueling banjos

We stopped at Zaharakos Ice Cream Parlor in Columbus, Indiana for a treat during our day trip in Bartholomew County. And they had the Banjo Orchestra machine playing its whole play list! Enjoy the “Dueling Banjos”!

Vanilla Milkshake

Butter pecan and caramel sauce sundae

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I caught all but the first few bars of the banjo pickin’ classic.

Here’s a post about our first trip to Zaharakos

Dolphin public art fountain in Columbus, Indiana

Columbus, Indiana is known for its very large numbers of public art display pieces. One beautiful piece is the centerpiece of a pretty fountain in the Northwest quadrant of the Bartholomew County Courthouse Square.

The veterans memorial is visible in the left rear

The limestone dolphin in the center of the fountain was sculpted by Indiana artist C.R. Schiefer. It was placed in 1978, a replacement for the original statue that was vandalized in 1976. Schiefer also has animal sculptures displayed in Martinsville, Bloomington and Terre Haute. His works are listed in the Smithsonian Art Inventories Catalog.

The Bartholomew County Memorial for Veterans

A most remarkable scene will greet you when you observe the south lawn of the Bartholomew County Courthouse in Columbus, Indiana. From the sidewalk you will see a series of tall stone columns. This is the Bartholomew County Memorial for Veterans. There are 25 columns, each 40 feet tall and positioned in a 5X5 foot grid. Recessed lights are positioned between the columns. Each column is rock cut Indiana limestone set on black granite.

The memorial is designed to be a tribute to those living and dead who answered our nation’s call during the twentieth century conflicts. It was dedicated in 1997. There are 156 names of local veterans engraved on the smooth sides of the columns. In addition to the names, there are inscriptions of letters sent home from veterans from their places overseas during the wars. Many of these were the last letters written home. Below the letters the date and places where they lost their lives are also recorded.

This memorial is really eye catching and remarkable to see. Allow for enough time to read the names engraved on the columns. Allow even more time to read the letters. So many of them are the last letters that the servicemen wrote home before they perished in combat. This is a most emotional memorial that brings home the gratitude you must express for our servicemen and women. Prepare to shed some tears.

Mill Race Park in Columbus Indiana

Mill Race Park is situated where the Flat Rock and the Driftwood rivers join together on the west side of Columbus. The 35 acre park is an extremely popular place to walk, picnic, attend concerts, climb the tall observation tower or just simply enjoy a bit of Nature.

The bottom of the bridge is in the background

Duck enjoying the reflecting pond

 

 

 

 

 

Among the attractions at the park are a large reflecting pond ringed by sidewalks and benches. One side of the pond features the historic covered bridge. Columbus is known for its public art displays, and several are located in the park. One recent addition to the park landscape is a set of tall, wooden poles topped with bat nesting boxes. The poles are set in rock cairns for shelter of amphibians and reptiles.

Each provides shelter for bats, birds, amphibians and reptiles

The lovely pond, suitable for leisurely walks or resting

The brick “monument” with bronze info plaque (yes, that’s us)

The brick “monument” complete with an arch and flanked by a bronze information plaque is a highly visible structure. The plaque describes the mill race that ran through acreage. It also listed the many industries along the old mill race, including mills and brickyards. The Mill Race Park in Columbus is a delightful place. It is worth your visit.

 

The historic Bartholomew County Courthouse in Columbus, Indiana

Bartholomew County, Indiana is south of Indianapolis and is known for its architecture, public art and well known and long running industry. Columbus is the county seat, and thus is home to the County Courthouse. This striking edifice was designed by noted Indiana architect Isaac Hodgson. The building was constructed from 1871–1874 at the cost of (then)$250,000. The courthouse was put on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.

A panorama view

The following Court House description is from Wikipedia: It is a three-story, Second Empire style red-brick building trimmed in limestone. It features a mansard roof, corner pavilions, Corinthian-order portico, and a six-level clock tower. The clock tower is 154 feet tall. A six-inch thick, 10-ten clock bell was installed in 1875. The clock’s weighted mechanism were replaced with an electric motor in 1940 and a 900-pound weight fell.

We visited on a Saturday, so the building was closed. It would be interesting to see inside this county government building.