Winter snows hit Seattle

December in Seattle area has begun with up to 6 inches of snow on the ground, surpassing the average total yearly snow fall in one event! Our grandson had a snow day, and we were able to explain to him what a “snow day” was.

About mid way through the 6 inch accumulation

Wonder how many kids in Seattle have seen rabbit tracks?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After 120 years of record-keeping, Seattle has witnessed just six white Christmases. The most recent White Christmas was in 2017. In that year 1.0 inches of snow fell at the city’s official reporting site at Sea-Tac Airport. Seattle’s winter weather is limited greatly by the Pacific Ocean, where temperatures stay fairly even throughout the year. Our daughter shared with us that snow removal equipment is few and far between out here, understandable as snow plows are rarely needed.

 

My conversation with Crow

The other day I was in our daughter’s backyard (near Seattle) taking photos of some of the leather medicine bags that I have been making while Sher and I have been staying with her, her husband and our 8 year old grandson.

My personal medicine bag trimmed with the colors of the 4 directions, a silver feather and a gift from the sea.

While I was arranging another leather medicine bag for photos, I heard a loud “caw-caw” from somewhere up the street. Almost immediately a large black crow landed in a small tree about 15 yards away. Crow then began to “talk” to me with varying tones and volume. I responded to him, and thanked him for sharing his space with me.

Crow and I shared space and spirit together for several minutes. Sharing time with animals is so inspiring to me, and I consider them exceptional opportunities to relish the chance to be at one with animals, Nature and Earth.  I asked him if I could take an image of him. Crow did not want his image taken, and he flew off as we said our farewells.

My gift of an apple

I cut some pieces from an apple for me, and then I took the rest of the apple and put it in the tree where Crow had been perched while we conversed. It is always a nice gesture to leave a gift whenever you have contact with Nature. When I have been gifted by Nature with stones, feathers, shells or even a leaf or flower I always leave a gift in thanks for the find.

Black Onyx Crow figure from Peru is 2 3/4 inches tall

A couple of days ago we all went to a wonderful gem and mineral store in Snohomish. I needed to get some sage for cleansing and smudging ceremonies. In this store I was immediately drawn to a display of beautiful carved crows made of black onyx that had been imported from Peru. I was strongly drawn to one and he went home with me. My conversation with Crow to me reinforced that the black onyx Peruvian crow was supposed to be. Yes, I believe Crow joining me for a bit was indeed an omen.

Double rainbow

The double rainbow has been revered throughout history and by many cultures as a sign of good luck, prosperity, love, connection of Earth and Heaven and other Spiritual meanings. It is a remarkable phenomena of Nature and you are fortunate when you witness a double rainbow in the sky.

Father of the modern tomato Alexander Livingston

Alexander W. Livingston (1821-1898), a Reynoldsburg, Ohio seedsman, in 1870 developed the first commercially successful variety of tomato. Known as “The Father of the modern tomato” his lovely house still stands and is part of a delightful park on what used to be the outskirts of Reynoldsburg, Ohio.

Built in 1865, now on the National Register of Historic Places

Entrance to the house, which is open for tours

Vintage furnishings in the house

Information sign

The other side

Nice park and trails on the grounds.

This park is no doubt quite lovely in spring when the trees and flowers open up. There are some great old fashioned tire swings and even a teeter-totter for the kids to enjoy, and of course lots of picnic tables. The City of Reynoldsburg has made a great area for recreation for its citizens.

 

Some squirrel scenes

Here’s some squirrel action we observed on the tree in our backyard.

This nut tastes pretty good, glad I found it.

There must be something to eat around here

The squirrels were out in force this afternoon enjoying the sunlight, even though it was chilly and windy with a definite feel of fall in the air.

Indiana fall colors

Indiana has beautiful displays of changing fall colors. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The fully changed trees are just stunning to see.


Fall is a most beautiful time of year in Indiana. My grandfather loved to travel and took trips several times a year. Granddaddy would never travel in October, thus would never miss the seasonal colors he loved so much.

Crater of Diamonds State Park in Arkansas, keep what you find

Sher and I had discussed going to the diamond mine in Arkansas for some time. We’d read about this place, and it sure sounded like a fun and adventurous outing. The site is a 95 million year old inactive volcano crater. The first diamonds were discovered in 1906. Various mining enterprises have been attempted over the years. In 1972 the Craters of Diamonds State Park was established.

A small portion of the 37 acres for diamond hunting

We were able to plan a stop at the State Park on one of our trips to Austin to see family. We were of course exicited at the prospect of finding a diamond, or at least some of the other intersting and colorful stones in the park. This park is the only diamond hunting areas open to the public in the world. You keep what you find.

Getting ready to head for the diamond field.

The ground was muddy and slick so we had to watch our footing. The 37 acres open for diamond hunting is plowed about once every month, thus opening up more chances for finds. A fairly large amount of 1 carat plus sized diamonds have been found at the park.

Ready to dig! There is a sign picturing a huge diamond found.

Shed for washing dirt for diamonds and gemstones

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We did not find any diamonds, but we did find some nice rocks for our landscaping at home. It was a fun way to spend a couple of hours. We enjoyed seeing some of the gear that others had. Pulled wagons filled with shovels, rakes, buckets and even sieves and screens. These are serious diamond hunters!